Cleveland: Advancing its Rust Belt Renaissance

Cleveland: Advancing its Rust Belt Renaissance

Cleveland’s story is one of industry, innovation and resilience that is characterized by risk-taking, artistry and grit passed on through generations. What began in 1796 is today a city enjoying a revitalization fueled by more than $16.7 billion worth of public and private development.

  • 1796 - U.S. General Moses Cleaveland from the Connecticut Land Company surveys the Western Reserve. The 3.3 million-acre piece of land on the shores of Lake Erie is called the "Western Reserve."
  • 1831 - The Cleveland Advertiser changes the spelling of the village's name to Cleveland, dropping the first "a" in order to fit the General's name upon the newspaper masthead.
  • 1832 - The Ohio and Erie Canal, connecting Akron with the Cuyahoga River near its mouth on Lake Erie in Cleveland, is completed.
  • 1870 - Standard Oil Company established by John D. Rockefeller.
  • 1920 - Cleveland is the fifth largest city in the nation with a population of 796,841 people. The Cleveland Indians win their first World Series.
  • 1921 - Cleveland Clinic founded.
  • 1924 - Cleveland hosts the Republican National Convention at Public Auditorium.
  • 1925 - Cleveland Municipal Airport, the nation’s first municipal airport opens (now Cleveland Hopkins International Airport).
  • 1928 - The Terminal Tower opens and remains the tallest building in the world outside of New York City until the completion of the main building of Moscow State University in Moscow in 1953.
  • 1933 - Clevelanders Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster create the comic book character Superman.
  • 1936 - Republican National Convention held in Cleveland at Public Auditorium. Clevelander Jesse Owens wins four gold medals at the Berlin Olympics.
  • 1952 - Alan Freed, Cleveland radio deejay, coins the term "Rock ‘n' Roll." First rock ‘n' roll concert, The Moondog Coronation Ball, is held in Cleveland.
  • 1967 - Carl B. Stokes elected mayor of Cleveland. He is the first African American mayor of a major U.S. city.
  • 1969 - An oil slick on the Cuyahoga River - polluted from decades of industrial waste - catches fire. As a result, advocacy by Mayor Carl Stokes and his brother, U.S. Representative Louis Stokes, played a part in the passage of the federal Clean Water Act of 1972.
  • 1979 - George Voinovich is elected Mayor of Cleveland.
  • 1986 - Cleveland selected as site of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum.
  • 1994 - The building now known as Quicken Loans Arena opens as the home of the Cleveland Cavaliers.
  • 2007 - The American Public Transportation Association names Cleveland's mass transit system the best in North America.
  • 2013 - The Cleveland Convention Center opens its doors in June. In October, the Global Center for Health Innovation opens, offering state-of-the-art space and technology for its high-profile healthcare industry tenants.